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Vote on Kate’s dresses from royal tour of Australia, New Zealand

Vote on Kate’s dresses from royal tour of Australia, New Zealand

Photos Vote on Kate's dresses from royal tour of Australia, New Zealand Kate's wardrobe includes coat by Canadian designer Erdem MoraliogluCBC News Posted: Apr 17, 2014 6:47 PM ET Last Updated: Apr 17, 2014 7:18 PM ETCatherine, Duchess of Cambridge, arrives in a batik print dress to an event in the Blue Mountains suburb of Winmalee, near Sydney, on April 17. Kate, Prince William and their son, Prince George, are on a three-week tour of New Zealand and Australia. (Phil Noble/Reuters)Related StoriesPrince William, Kate and son tour Australia Baby Prince George off on first royal tour to Australia, N.Z. Royal couple, Prince George to embark on New Zealand, Australia tour Prince William and his wife Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, are on a 19-day tour of New Zealand and Australia, marking their first official trip overseas with their son, Prince George.While the seven-month-old prince was predicted to steal the show on his first official visit abroad, Kate's wardrobe is also drawing comments as the royal couple make their way through an adventurous itinerary Down Under.Her outfits have ranged from a dressed-down nautical blazer to a Royal Air Force-inspired dress and a coat by Canadian designer Erdem Moralioglu. Use the interactive below to see what Kate is wearing and vote on your favourites.Over their nearly three-week tour, the royal trio will visit 12 cities and plan to take part in activities as wide-ranging as a yacht race, paying their respects to victims of the 2011 earthquake in Christchurch and visiting Ayers Rock in central Australia.In 1983, when Prince William was nine months old, he took a similar trip with his parents on their official tour of the same two countries. Report TypoSend Feedback Latest World Gallery Prince William, Kate and son tour AustraliaPrince George and Kate's 1st royal visit to New Zealand, Australia Stay Connected with CBC News Mobile Facebook Podcasts Alerts Newsletter More Galleries Prince William, Kate and son tour Australia Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel-winning author, dead at 87 Operation Nunalivut in Canada's North Floodwaters rise in N.B., Ontario, Quebec
Will Arnett files for divorce from Amy Poehler

Will Arnett files for divorce from Amy Poehler

Will Arnett, Amy Poehler divorce papers filed Couple married in 2003, but has been separated for 18 monthsThe Associated Press Posted: Apr 17, 2014 12:13 AM ET Last Updated: Apr 17, 2014 12:13 AM ETAmy Poehler and Torontonian Will Arnett were married in 2003 and have two sons together. The couple has been separated for 18 months.Related StoriesWill Arnett to be honoured at Banff TV festival Golden Globes 2014: 5 memorable moments Court records show Will Arnett has filed for divorce from Amy Poehler more than 18 months after the comedians announced their separation.Arnett filed a divorce petition in Los Angeles Superior Court on April 8 citing irreconcilable differences. His filing seeks joint custody of the pair's two sons, who are ages three and five.Arnett speaks to Q's Jian Ghomeshi about playing cocky, dumb The actors announced they were separating in September 2012 after nine years of marriage.They were married in 2003 and have maintained successful careers, with Poehler starring in NBC's Parks and Recreation and Arnett starring in CBS's series The Millers.The court filing was first reported Wednesday by People magazine. Report TypoSend Feedback
Fifty Shades, Captain Underpants make list of ‘challenged’ books in U.S.

Fifty Shades, Captain Underpants make list of ‘challenged’ books in U.S.

The potty humour of Captain Underpants children's books and the mature exploration of race and family violence by Nobel laureate Toni Morrison in The Bluest Eye would seem to have little in common.But among some parents, educators and other members of the general public who worry about what books are stocked at their local libraries, the works fall into the same category – they're just too offensive and should be restricted or removed from the shelves.The American Library Association published its annual State of the Libraries report Sunday, which included its list of works most frequently "challenged" last year at schools and libraries.Dav Pilkey's bestselling picture book series topped the list, just as his Captain Underpants did in 2012. The reasons cited included "offensive language" and material unsuited for its targeted age group.The Bluest Eye, Morrison's first novel, was runner-up, also criticized for language, along with violence and sexual content..Sherman Alexie's prize-winning The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, a perennial on the list, was No. 3, for reasons including drug references, sexual content and racism.Pilkey said in a statement issued by his publisher, Scholastic Inc., that he found it surprising "that a series with no sex, no nudity, no drugs, no profanity and no more violence than a Superman cartoon has caused such an uproar.'A tiny percentage of adults' complaining"Of course, only a tiny percentage of adults are complaining. Kids love the books, and fortunately most parents and educators do, too," he said.E L James' mega-selling, ultra-explicit Fifty Shades of Grey was No. 4, followed by the violent world of Suzanne Collins' blockbuster The Hunger Games.The long-running Captain Underpants series' potty humour landed it on the American Library Association's list of books most frequently cited as offensive by schools and libraries in the U.S. (Scholastic Trade Book Publishing/Associated Press)Others in the top 10 were Tanya Lee Stone's A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl (drugs, sex); John Green's Looking for Alaska" (drugs, sex); Stephen Chbosky's The Perks of Being a Wallflower (drugs, homosexuality); Rudolfo Anaya's Bless Me, Ultima (Satanism, offensive language, sex); and Jeff Smith's Bone series (political viewpoint, racism, violence)."The list shows the wide range of books that can get people rattled and touch upon their deepest fears and antagonisms," said Barbara Jones, who directs the library association's Office for Intellectual Freedom.The office defines a challenge as a "formal, written complaint filed with a library or school requesting that a book or other material be restricted or removed because of its content or appropriateness." The office received 307 challenges last year, down from 464 in 2012 and far below the levels of the 1980s and '90s.Exact numbers, including how many books were actually pulled, are hard to calculate. The association has long believed that for every complaint registered, four to five go unreported by libraries and that some librarians may restrict access in anticipation of objections. The list is based on press accounts and reports from librarians, teachers and "concerned individuals."Harry Potter, Twilight made list in past years"The number is low this year," Jones said. "We'd like to think it's because people finally understand that pulling a book from their shelves isn't going to solve the problem they're worried about it. But it could be an anomaly."Many of the books are cited for the very actions and attitudes they were trying to criticize, whether The Bluest Eye for violence or Alexie's novel for racism. It's a long tradition, Jones noted, dating back at least to the accusations of racism made against Mark Twain's satirical The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn."People focus on a word, or a handful of words, and often lift them out of the context of the books," Jones said.The list often reflects what's popular among kids and young adults at the time. Over the past decade, the Harry Potter books and the Twilight series have appeared in the top 10, and Jones thought that the new report would include Veronica Roth's Divergent books."We might be a bit behind on that trend," Jones said. "But as far as next year, yeah, we're waiting."
Christina Hendricks ‘Not Really Interested In Having Children’

Christina Hendricks ‘Not Really Interested In Having Children’

James White for Health

Her Mad Men character balances being a partner at the ad firm with raising a baby (whose secret father, viewers know, is silver fox Roger Sterling). Christina Hendricks, however, is content to pamper a furrier friend: her new dog.

“We got a puppy, and that’s my idea of starting a family. People say, ‘Oh, that’s practice for parenting,’ but if it’s practice for anything it’s to be a mom to another puppy,” Hendricks, 38, tells Health in their May issue, on stands April 18.

“We’ve decided that we are not really interested in having children.”

She continues: “It’s just very normal for people to say, ‘Well, when you guys have kids …’ And then when I say, ‘Actually, I don’t think we’re going to do that,’ people will say, ‘Oh, you say that now …’ It doesn’t bother me, though. And, you know, there’s a small chance I could change my mind.”

James White for Health

For now, Hendricks is busy bidding farewell to Mad Men‘s Joan, the beautiful former secretary she calls “incredibly blunt” and full of “feminine power.” She has some time to say goodbye: The wildly successful AMC series is splitting its seventh and final season across two years.

Plenty of fans are sure to miss drooling over Joan’s quick wit and celebrated curves  — qualities Hendricks’s actor husband, Geoffrey Arend, 36, pegged as potential from the show’s start.

“Whenever we see something about it, he always says, ‘I told you from the beginning. I’m the one who called it first,’” Hendricks told the magazine of her sexy image.

“So he just wants a little credit. Really, he’s sweet and he’s happy for me.”

– Michele Corriston

What really happened to the Bell of Batoche

What really happened to the Bell of Batoche

Researchers have unearthed a document trail that reveals what really happened to a historic Canadian artifact — the Bell of Batoche.The CBC documentary unit has found evidence the bell that was ceremoniously returned to Batoche and the Métis Nation last summer, 128 years after being taken by Canadian soldiers, is not the real Bell of Batoche, but was in fact a bell that had been sent to Frog Lake, Alta. — 400 kilometres from Batoche, Sask.They also discovered a series of handwritten certificates and notes that show the bell that was hanging in the Batoche chapel in the late 19th Century had been donated to another Catholic mission in nearby St. Laurent de Grandin, about 12 kilometres away.Bell of Batoche may not be from Batoche, CBC documentary reveals Doc Zone: The Mystery of the Bell Visit CBC Aboriginal That church was built by Father Jules Le Chevallier, and he needed a bell.Historian Juliette Champagne combed through parish archives and discovered the baptismal certificate that came with the bell when it was donated to St. Laurent. It’s signed Vital G, bishop of St.Albert.Sept. 2nd, 1884 - We, Bishop Vital G. Grandin, Bishop of St. Albert have blessed the bell for the Mission of St. Antoine de Padoux, Batoche . This bell having been blessed in honour of the very blessed virgin and of St. Anthony bears the name of Marie Antoinette.That certificate is accompanied by a note signed by Father Le Chevallier.This bell having ceased to serve the parish of Batoche after a considerably larger bell was purchased in 1892 has been given by the parish priest with the agreement of the parish synod and has been raised in the bell tower of the new chapel at St. Laurent during the summer of 1937.“If you take that literally, this is Marie Antoinette,” said Celine Perillat, who runs the historical centre in nearby Duck Lake, and has access to the shrine now on the site.Le Chevallier’s original church burned down in 1990. The bell burned with it. Only a few chunks of copper and the clapper survived. The shaft measures 29 centimetres in length and matches the Grandin bells cast in France.Le Chevallier’s original church burned down in 1990 and the bell burned with it. Historian Juliette Champagne is pictured with remains of the bell. (CBC)The pieces are kept under lock and key in a glass case in the shrine.“I think it’s in its proper place,” Perillat said.“The bell if it was donated ... to St. Laurent from Batoche, then it became part and parcel of the history of the St. Laurent parish.”Le Chevallier’s church has been rebuilt and pilgrims come every summer to pray at the shrine. Some of them have claimed miracles after their visit.“I would say that it’s in its resting place because the true Bell of Batoche is the one that sits in the steeple now,” Perillat said, referring to the bell that is now in the National Historic Site at Batoche.“It’s the one that the ​Métis people have used for all these years. It’s the one that you know has rung in the services, has brought in the baptisms, celebrated the weddings. It has sounded the funerals. It’s the bell of the people who lived and persevered and survived at Batoche."
Rob Lowe Has the Secret to Raising Down-to-Earth Kids

Rob Lowe Has the Secret to Raising Down-to-Earth Kids

Araya Diaz/Filmmagic

Rob Lowe is more than just an award-winning actor — he’s also a super devoted dad.

The former Parks and Recreation star’s two sons John Owen, 18, and Matthew, 20, are happy, down-to-earth young adults. But how is that possible if they grew up with a Hollywood star for a dad?

“You have to be willing to make some sacrifices,” Lowe said at a Mamarazzi event, hosted by The MOMS of SiriusXM, on Tuesday.

“I moved my kids out of Los Angeles, immediately. I’ve lived in Santa Barbara for 20 years almost. I’ve had my picture taken there three times.”

The move meant making a two-hour commute twice a day to film Parks. Despite the distance, he made a serious effort to be a normal dad, even coaching his sons’ sports teams.

“Show business is actually my job and my kids truly see it as my job,” Lowe says. “Every once in awhile they get flabbergasted that I’m famous. They’re like, ‘Dad! You know Jim Carrey?’ Truthfully, they don’t get it.”

By raising his sons out of the spotlight, the 50-year-old actor and author of the new book, Love Life, says he’s managed to give them a great gift.

“Not everybody is in show business where my kids grew up, and they see that the world is so much bigger than that,” Lowe explains.

– Emma Tyler

Filed Under:News, Parenting, Rob Lowe
Vanessa Lachey Loves Watching Camden ‘Become a Little Man’

Vanessa Lachey Loves Watching Camden ‘Become a Little Man’

Landov

Vanessa Lachey has one smart cookie on her hands.

The Dads star’s 19-month-old son, Camden John, is quickly learning to communicate with his parents and says more than just a few words.

“He says, ‘Avocado please, yogurt please, strawberries please, down please,’ or, ‘Come here,’ which means pick me up, ‘Love me, hug me, kiss me,’ — that’s his favorite thing,” Lachey, 33, told PEOPLE at the mobile launch of Farm Heroes Saga at the Flatiron Plaza in N.Y.C.

“He likes to learn, he’s so good. His verbal level to me is beyond what I’ve expected and he doesn’t get aggressive.”

But his language skills aren’t the only thing he’s mastering.

“He’s obsessed with books, he goes and gets his flash cards and he loves cars, fire trucks, taxi cabs [and] anything having to do with transportation,” Lachey, who recently moved to New York City with husband Nick Lachey for his new vH1 gig, shares.

“He’s the sweetest guy, he gives you kisses and hugs and just wants to play,” Lachey continues. “It’s really cute to watch him grow, learn and become this little man.”

– Mabel Martinez

Bell of Batoche may not be from Batoche, CBC documentary reveals

Bell of Batoche may not be from Batoche, CBC documentary reveals

It's not often that the mysteries of history are definitively solved.That appeared to be the case last summer, when the Bell of Batoche was returned to the Métis​ Nation after being taken by Canadian soldiers 128 years ago.Visit CBC Aboriginal Doc Zone: The Mystery of the Bell However, the entire story may need a rewrite, in light of new evidence uncovered by CBC's documentary unit.The Bell of Batoche also known amongst Metis as “Marie Antoinette” sounds again in Saskatchewan during Back to Batoche Days in Batoche, SK on Saturday, July 20, 2013 in Batoche. (Peter Mills/CBC) ​ Canadian history books tell the story like this:In 1885, the railroad was expanding west. The buffalo herds were nearly extinct. Ottawa was parcelling off land to new settlers and speculators.The First Nations were being pressured onto reservations, and the Métis​ were being ignored by Ottawa – their lands and their rights threatened.Fifteen years earlier, Louis Riel had won the Métis​ their land and language rights in Manitoba.He had come to Batoche to fight the same battle in Saskatchewan.Within weeks, he and the Métis declared their own government and sovereignty of the northwest.Enraged, Ottawa mobilized the Canadian army, sending 5,000 soldiers to crush the rebellion.Seven weeks after the shooting started, the Métis​ made their last stand at Batoche.It fell on May 12, 1885."Our men have been pillaging. Each man has something he intends to keep as a souvenir," eyewitness Robert Allen wrote at the time.According to one account, sometime in the days that followed, Canadian soldiers stole the nine-kilogram silver bell as a trophy from the church at Batoche.It was on display in a legion hall in Millbrook, Ont., until 1991, when it disappeared just one week after a delegation of Manitoba Métis leaders came to visit.Billyjo Delaronde admitted to stealing the bell from a legion hall in Millbrook, Ont., in 1991. (CBC)​Last August, Métis​ leaders returned what they believed to be the Bell of Batoche to the church bearing its name, which is now a national monument."My name is Billyjo Delaronde. I've been the subject of speculation and bell sightings for the last 22 years," said the man who has admitted to stealing the bell from Millbrook."I am certain of one thing. I have risked my liberty and maybe even my life to bring Marie Antoinette home."But, CBC's documentary unit has uncovered historical records that show that bell is actually from Frog Lake, Alta., a community 400 kilometres away from Batoche.It's where some of the soldiers went after winning the Battle of Batoche, to quell what they were told was an aboriginal uprising and massacre.Robert Winslow's great uncle wrote of his men taking a bell from the Roman Catholic church there."All was desolation," Capt. Charles Winslow wrote."The only thing left was a stockade fence around where the Roman Catholic church had stood, and, at the gate, two posts, on which was swinging a small bell, and as there was quite a crave for souvenirs, some of the men of my company, without my knowledge, of any of the officers' knowledge, took it down in this night, packed it in a box with some old clothing and managed to smuggle it home."A second soldier corroborates that version of events in a diary entry found in a small museum in Caledonia, Ont.Our company then presented the town with a large bell that we had brought from Frog Lake, to be used as a fire bell. The bell had belonged to the Roman Catholic mission at Frog Lake and one dark night two of our lads went and seized the bell and nailing it up in a wooden box had brought it home to Millbrook.Yours truly,Will YoungBut, how did the Frog Lake bell become known as the Bell of Batoche?​​It started in 1967 with a small error on page 53 of a small centennial yearbook published by a county historical society.It reads: The bell that hung on the fire hall incidentally was captured from a Roman Catholic church at Batoche in the Northwest Territories during the Riel Rebellion in 1885.Historian Juliette Champagne has combed through the archives of Bishop Vital Grandin, the man who had 20 identical church bells made, including the Frog Lake and Batoche bells."In all my research, I have not seen a document or a letter or a parish record that says that the bell at Batoche was stolen, never," Champagne said.What she did find, is Bishop Grandin's account of what actually happened to the Bell of Batoche.Watch The Mystery of the Bell on CBC-TV's Doc Zone Thursday 9 p.m. (all time zones), to find out more.
14-year-old Montreal piano prodigy wows Ellen DeGeneres

14-year-old Montreal piano prodigy wows Ellen DeGeneres

Daniel Clarke Bouchard is just back from an appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, where the 14-year-old wowed the American talk-show host and her studio audience with piano skills that are well beyond his years. 'I was so rejoiced when she emailed,'- Daniel Clarke Bouchard, piano prodigy on being contacted by Ellen DeGeneres “It was such a great experience. It was amazing. I kind of — for the first time ever maybe — got a 0.01 per cent feeling of nervousness,” Clarke Bouchard told CBC.Clarke Bouchard appeared on The Ellen DeGeneres Show on Monday, and played an original piece of jazz music — a boogie woogie ​— that he composed himself.“Ellen is really nice and I really had a great interview. It was so much fun to be in front of the people because I love performing,” Clarke Bouchard said, adding that his musical roots lie in classical music.“I’m always gonna be a classical musician. It’s where I started, it’s how I started to love music,” he said.“And I’m wearing a bow tie. So there you go, it confirms it — I’m playing classical.”Clarke Bouchard started playing the piano at the age of five. Since then, he’s played with renowned Canadian jazz pianist Oscar Peterson and performed at the prestigious Carnegie Hall concert venue in New York City.While on the show, Clarke Bouchard told Ellen he is a huge hockey fan, and cheers for the Los Angeles Kings.Ellen surprised him by bringing out Kings' goalie Jonathan Quick.The piano prodigy and young hockey player said four things landed him on the Ellen show.“A tweet, an email, luck and chance. It was the first time I ever tweeted anything so I guess it was quite the tweet to send out for the first time.”He followed up with an email — and waited three months for a reply.“I was so rejoiced when she emailed. I was just so happy,” he said.Clarke Bouchard said between all his concerts, he’d also like to get into acting, and maybe even be an astronaut one day."Being the first pianist on the moon is always something I've wanted to accomplish ... I keep myself grounded and I do the best I can.”Watch his performance on Ellen here:
A.Y. Jackson honoured in First World War art exhibits marking centenary

A.Y. Jackson honoured in First World War art exhibits marking centenary

The Canadian War Museum is launching its commemoration of the centenary of the First World War with two art exhibitions, which it hopes can help people reflect on what the conflict meant for those who experienced it, even though the combatants are no longer living.The first art exhibition, Witness, draws on the museum's large Beaverbrook collection, which contains 2,500 pieces by official war artists hired to document the war effort overseas and on the home front.Some artworks have not been displayed in decades such as a large, long canvas by Charles Simpson of lumbermen cutting spruce trees in B.C. for the production of aircraft. The painting was last displayed in 1926.More than a dozen works of art done privately by Canadian soldiers are also on display for the first time."It takes us back to that time," said the museum's art historian Laura Brandon. "The point of the official art, and the point of the private art, was to share an experience. There's no one alive with whom we can share that experience directly today."The second exhibition, Transformations, traces the art of two renowned artists who fought on different sides of the conflict: Canada's A.Y. Jackson and Germany's Otto Dix."We knew they had both experienced in the trenches, at the front, what it was they were depicting," said Brandon. "So, we could look across no-man's land, so to speak, and see what happened to them before the war, during the war, and after the war."Paintings by Jackson's Group of Seven colleagues Arthur Lismer, Frederick Varley and Lawren Harris are also on display.​Brandon pointed out how Jackson's post-war paintings of Northern Ontario landscapes as a member of the Group of Seven refer to his experience on the front: rolling trench-like hills with broken and twisted trees, which she said are symbolic of the loss of life during the war.The landscape paintings by Otto Dix, meanwhile, are the largest collection ever assembled in North America. Brandon said they are not simply bucolic landscapes, as Dix used looming storm clouds as a way to subtly criticize the rise of the Nazis in the 1930s.Both exhibitions — Transformations and Witness — will be on display at the Canadian War Museum until Sept. 21, 2014. As the centenary of the 1914-1918 war continues, the War Museum will also present other exhibitions tied to specific events, such as a look at the battle of Vimy Ridge in 2017.
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